Author Topic: Castor Oil for Joint Swelling  (Read 6980 times)

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Offline CalamityJane

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Castor Oil for Joint Swelling
« on: Saturday November 24, 2007, 02:00:12 AM »
If somebody else had posted this, I likely would believe it!  ::)

I bought some Castor Oil for the Health Food Shop, for $2.47. I have a number of knuckles closest to the nail that are swollen and sore from osteo I'm assuming. Two are next to each other. For the last day and a half, I've put this oil onto one of the two fingers, and today I can hardly believe my eyes. The swelling has shrunk probably by about a third.

Anybody tried this at all?

Jane
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Offline Pariah

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Re: Castor Oil for Joint Swelling
« Reply #1 on: Saturday November 24, 2007, 03:41:47 AM »
Hi, Jane -

As long as you don't react to the salicylate acid in castor oil, go for it for as long as it works! It is historically an anti-inflammatory(see reference below).I have have seen some of the old mtn people here use castor oil, "horse liniment," skunk oil, and even WD-40! Most using the castor oil found some relief, but not over a long period of time. It will be interesting to see how long it works for you. Keep us posted on it!
I have heard of it being used for warts, hair replacement, & bruises in addition to the joint pain. All thru "home remedy" sources tho. And too, my grandmother use to give all of us kids a tablespoon of it when only one of us "acted up" - usually a boy cousin- while playing at her house. It tasted absolutely awful! I avoided her house when that particular cousin was there! Blaaaaaaah!

Are you sure it is osteo? Take a look here:  http://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec05/ch067/ch067c.html

I have become highly sensitive to salicylate acid. I cannot even use my old standby, aloe, any more because of it.

I am going to try to cut and paste here, but I am not sure how to put info inside the little blue boxes yet!

----------From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

Salicylic acid (from the Latin word for the willow tree, Salix, from whose bark it can be obtained) is a beta hydroxy acid (BHA) with the formula C6H4(OH)CO2H, where the OH group is adjacent to the carboxyl group. This colorless crystalline organic acid is widely used in organic synthesis and functions as a plant hormone. It is derived from the metabolism of salicin. It is probably best known as a compound that is chemically similar but not identical to the active component of aspirin.
Also known as 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, one of several beta hydroxy acids (compare to AHA), salicylic acid is a key ingredient in many skin-care products for the treatment of acne, psoriasis, calluses, corns, keratosis pilaris, and warts. It works by causing the cells of the epidermis to slough off more readily, preventing pores from clogging up, and allowing room for new cell growth. Because of its effect on skin cells, salicylic acid is used in several shampoos used to treat dandruff. Salicylic acid is also used as an active ingredient in gels which remove verrucas (plantar warts). Use of concentrated solutions of salicylic acid may cause hyperpigmentation on unpretreated skin for those with darker skin types (Fitzpatrick phototypes IV, V, VI), as well as with the lack of use of a broad spectrum sunblock.[4][5]
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The medicinal properties of salicylate, mainly for fever relief, have been known since ancient times, and it was used as an anti-inflammatory drug.[6]
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Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid or ASA) can be prepared by the esterification of the phenolic hydroxyl group of salicylic acid.
Subsalicylate in combination with bismuth form the popular stomach relief aid known commonly as Pepto-Bismol. When combined, the two key ingredients help control diarrhea, nausea, heartburn, and gas. It is also a very mild antibiotic.
Although toxic in large quantities, salicylic acid is used as a food preservative and antiseptic in toothpaste. For some people with salicylate sensitivity even these small doses can be harmful.
Sodium salicylate is a useful phosphor in the vacuum ultraviolet with nearly flat quantum efficiency for wavelengths between 10 to 100 nm.[7] It fluoresces in the blue at 420 nm. It is easily prepared on a clean surface by spraying a saturated solution of the salt in methanol followed by evaporation.
[edit]Safety

Salicylic acid has an ototoxic effect, and can induce transient hearing loss in zinc-deficient individuals.
This finding is based on clinical studies with rats. An injection of salicylic acid induced hearing loss in zinc-deficient rats, while a simultaneous injection of zinc reversed the hearing loss. An injection of magnesium in the zinc-deficient rats did not reverse the salicylic acid-induced hearing loss.
Salicylic acid is toxic in large amounts. Pregnant women are advised not to use products containing salicylic acid due to the danger of Reye's syndrome.
Some people are hypersensitive to salicylic acid and related compounds.
The United States Food and Drug Administration recommends the use of sun protection when using skincare products containing salicylic acid (or any other BHA) on sun-exposed skin areas. [8]



Salicylate sensitivity

Salicylate sensitivity, also known as salicylate intolerance, is a chemical reaction that occurs when too much salicylate (salicylic acid) is introduced into a person's system. Salicylates are chemicals that occur naturally in plants and serve as a natural immune hormone and preservative, protecting the plants against diseases, insects, fungi, and harmful bacteria. Salicylate can also be found synthetically in many medications, perfumes and preservatives. This chemical can cause health problems in anyone when consumed in large doses. But, for those who are salicylate intolerant even small doses of salicylate can cause reactions. This reaction is different than a true allergy as it is a pharmacological reaction (like the side effects of a drug) and not an immunological reaction. People with salicylate sensitivity are unable to handle more than a certain amount of salicylates at a time without symptoms occurring.

Good luck with it! Symiere
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Offline itchychick

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Re: Castor Oil for Joint Swelling
« Reply #2 on: Saturday November 24, 2007, 06:35:42 AM »
Never tried it Jane.... I must admit being a bit frightened of the stuff.... my dad tells stories about how his mum put it in his orange juice for when he was little, and he was unable to willingly drink orange juice for years afterwards!

I hope you have continued relief!

Offline CalamityJane

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Re: Castor Oil for Joint Swelling
« Reply #3 on: Saturday November 24, 2007, 04:59:29 PM »
Hi girls, thank you!

First off, I must say that I was told at the shop that this Castor Oil is very different from that dreadful stuff we had to take years ago, that went down in a huge awful 'glob'.  Don't ask me what the difference is because I've no idea! ::) The bottle clearly states in large letters 'For External Use Only'. As well, they told me in the store that it is not to be taken internally, thank gawd!

So I don't know, are there 2 types of castor oil?

Symiere, re the arthritis. I'm assuming it's osteo, but have wondered at times if its PA. I had my hands x-rayed a few years ago and the results were 'scattered erosive arthritis'. Next month I go to a new derm, apparently THE guy to see here -- I've had to wait almost a year. As my PPP is in remission, there's not much for him to see, but he can look at my fingers and nails. 0n my PPP foot, the big toe nail for the last year has not grown in length, but rather has grown upwards from the cuticle forming a sort of thick step.

I wondered this morning if the castor oil is a sort of inflammatory. It must be as you say, because the result is quite astounding. It certainly can't do any harm. I'm just doing one finger at a time so I can compare.

Thank you muchly for the info and the link!

Jane
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Offline CalamityJane

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Re: Castor Oil for Joint Swelling
« Reply #4 on: Saturday November 24, 2007, 08:09:26 PM »
Just took a couple of pics of fingers. Hard to see properly, but the ring finger was almost as large as the middle finger, just 2 days ago.


« Last Edit: Saturday November 24, 2007, 08:11:50 PM by CalamityJane »
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Offline Pariah

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Re: Castor Oil for Joint Swelling
« Reply #5 on: Tuesday November 27, 2007, 02:00:39 AM »
Nice progress, Jane! I am tempted to slather the stuff on my left knee and see if I can rub it down into the right hip joint! Amazing what it has done for you in just a few applications!

Oh! You may be interested in this:  Have friends who have an older Boston bulldog. I never really cared for the breed, but this one is beautiful and so sweet. She can hardly move if they forget to put a TBS of coconut oil in her food for more than 2 days. Her coat also shines; it looks slick. I have been putting a tsp in my cat's ration of 1/2 can every 3-4 days (he gets dry other days) for just a few weeks now and he does not lick or scratch at all like he did in late summer. Indeed, his fur is shiny and he is much happier. I cook with the coconut oil now, too. ..hum-mm....maybe it is time I finally tried it on my skin! :o

I have a PPP toenail that grows up like yours now- the tiny one on the left foot. It gets "mushy" during a flare. Seems to be more "skin" than nail. Do your finger/toe nails have pits or ridges? I have had definitive ridges for years, but now I am beginning to see pits in some. You know, maybe this should be in a PPP post? Should I continue here or would you suggest another thread or a new one?

I'll definitely come back here for The Finger Watch tho! :)     Symiere
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Offline CalamityJane

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Re: Castor Oil for Joint Swelling
« Reply #6 on: Tuesday November 27, 2007, 02:38:28 AM »
Hi Symiere, thanks for interesting reply and your kind words re my fingers. It's gone down a bit more since yesterday. This stuff is quite labour intensive, as I'd been applying 5 or 6 times a day, and has to be done when hands will be dry for a while.

Yes, I do have ridged nails, and have had them years and years. There are posts in PPP Thread on that I believe. I'll let you know what the super-derm says about my toe nail after I see him next month (17th).

Re the coconut oil. Maybe I should try it on my lab, who currently has a rash! ::) Funny you should mention that, because just yesterday I was reading an article on problem hair which I have (curly, wavy, dry, coarse), and they recommend coconut oil on the scalp at night, then wash the next morning.  Hmmmm......how's your hair? Mine is this way now because I'm post menopausal, and have always had dry hair.....damp weather makes the waves and curls so tight........*sigh* Doesn't coconut oil have lots of bad LDL, or something. I use Olive Oil, or Canola oil to cook with.

This is a stretch I know, but can you take a pic of the toenail, specially from the side? I'll send one back of mine, which is easy because it's the big toe. Mine just started about 3 months before the PPP went into remission.

Jane

PS 0h, if you think we are going to get into a long conflab about this, we can switch to the PPP thread, or Admin will do it rest assured if we are wrong! Thanks Admin! :-*

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