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Our approaching Holidays are going to take a terrible and preventable toll in lives.  We  *A *I *I need to do our part in prevention by not traveling long distances to indoor feasts!  The contagion is already entirely beyond our capacity to deal with it.  How can we not see that?  There are now multiple reports of patients complaining that it is nowhere near as serious as everyone else is pretending!, ...and dying with a ventilator jammed down their throats!  How can we collectively be that obtuse?
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Let me introduce myself ... / Re: Miscellany
« Last post by anthropositor on Saturday November 21, 2020, 03:45:47 AM »
Soon later, still chewing on my greens and blossoms, I saw Big Sister with several of her laughing girlfriends, on the cinder road between the church and our backyard Victory Garden, which, far as I could tell, had never produced any food except contorted puny carrots, cabbages the bugs had sense enough to ignore, and corn twice as tall as me.  But when I stripped the husks and silk, worms of some kind had made it pretty disgusting to see.  But I was far away.  What I was eating was better anyway, and pretty close to being chewed.  Big Sister hadn't seen me hunkered down in the tall lawn.  I was still as a cat, contentedly chewing.  They were getting closer.  I wished I hadn't stuffed my mouth so full.

Then, one of her girlfriends saw me!  Chewchewchewchewchew.  "Sandy!  What are you doing over there?  What's in your mouth?"  Chewchewchew.  She was now charging like a rhinoceros, leaving the other girls way behind.  I jumped up and ran, still chewing as fast as I could.  She wasn't a rhino any more.  She was a hawk or an owl, sinking her talons into my arms.  I went down chewing.  "What is it!  Spit it out now!"  She was a little breathless.  Her points dug in as she rolled me over.  We were eye to eye.  She looked mad enough to bite my nose off.  Her girlfriends were all laughing at this unexpected action, and it didn't feel like they were laughing at me, somehow.

She hissed, "Spit it out you little snot! ...or you'll be sorry."  Heck, it seemed to me I was already sorry.  I swallowed hard and smiled greenly.
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General Health / Re: kidney stones
« Last post by anthropositor on Friday November 20, 2020, 10:43:38 PM »
Well Derrick, your post asks only a single, one line, sort of ambiguous question.  The page inserted above that question is someone else's, whom I have always favored, throughout many years.  Your Profile is genderless, ageless, locationless, and says that you have a skin condition called "Mandatory." 

The mandatory condition is extremely difficult to deal with, and may turn out to be incurable.  For your sake, I hope not.  In the absence of anything real, take these two little pills  ;D ;D with a gulp of branch water.  If you suddenly burst out laughing until the water blasts out of your nose, your particular Mandatory is absolutely curable!

Meanwhile, welcome to Skincell.  Anthropositor
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General Health / Re: kidney stones
« Last post by DerrickAntoine on Friday November 20, 2020, 04:32:15 PM »
Oh man.

It's 2:30 AM. About thirty minutes ago I woke up with a now-familiar pain in my back. It feels like an arrow wound from my flank to my lady area. I took a loritab and I'm waiting for it to kick in. Those pills are strong, and I've got faith. And some killer pain tolerance.

I first felt this about 5:45 AM Thursday morning. Nicely timed, frankly, it's the one morning I don't work. When it didn't subside by 6:30, I was willing to go to a doc-in-the-box. Alas, none were open. Mama took me to the emergency room. I wasn't in much shape to protest.

By the time the doctor came in to see me, the pain was gone. I wanted to know what was wrong anyway. They said it was my first-ever kidney stone! Yay! 3 mm, already at the edge of whatever tube leads to the bladder. They told me to strain my pee, gave me pills for the pain, nausea and bladder infection, and told me the worst was over. I admit, I wondered why these were considered such a big deal. It wasn't any worse than the worst of my menstrual cramps, and didn't last near as long.

Ha. Ha. Ha.

I felt a little odd and off Thursday evening, and took a pain pill on Mama's advice. It made me loopy and then knocked me out.

I saw the urologist Friday morning. It was about what I expected - expensive, and with a doctor who was in too much of a hurry to really answer my questions. The nurse described a stone that was about twice the size I expected 3 mm to be. Nobody seemed surprised that I was perfectly healthy. I headed to Florida with Twiga Friday night. I specifically asked the ER nurse if I was OK to travel, and she said yes.

We were nearly to the Florida border when the second wave hit. This time the nausea was in full force. I curled up in the seat and tried to have stilted conversation, interrupted by me losing my dinner at a gas station. I kept waiting for the pain to pass like it had the first time... but to no avail. I eventually took a pain pill but I didn't keep it, or anything else, down. Even after we got to Bethy's I was running for the toilet, and not to pee out a little solid object.

I caught something in the strainer - I think - Saturday morning. TINY little black thing, smaller then 3 mm and much smaller than the nurse described. I took a nausea pill in a desperate attempt to keep breakfast down. It also knocked me plum out. Saturday night I was finally better and able to have fun with my friends.

Left work early Monday from nausea and lack of energy. Came home and napped - never a good sign. I woke up OK for my therapist appointment, and thought I was going to be fine until about 5, when I started feeling weak again. Food helped, but shortly after eating I felt awful again and left my usual D&D group early.

I called my sister. She's only had a million of these things. Is it normal to be fine - sick - fine - sick - fine? She assured me that they can and do miss stones in ct scans. If I had two close together they might look like one, or one could hide behind the other. Fine. I looked up the side effects of the antibiotic. Aha - that's why I haven't been able to keep anything down. Y'all, I don't care if I create a mutant bladder infection strain and die of it, I am NOT taking the last pill.

Yeah right. Like I'm gonna jinx myself like that. I'll take it, but only after work tomorrow and only because I don't have more than one left. Assuming I can go to work! I'm still in crazy pain here. I type a few words and then curl up. It's nearly 3...

Honestly, I don't even know if I should go back to a doctor, and if so, who. Are these things not moving? One of my gaming buddies had to have his surgically removed, and they weren't any bigger than mine. He said they just wouldn't pass no matter what. Are there suddenly 45 of these things instead of one? What test is going to catch that?

I started out wondering why this was such a big deal and assuming I just got lucky. At this point I realize I didn't get lucky at all, and I'm wondering when (and by "when" I really mean "if") this nightmare is ever going to end. Is having sudden severe pain the new norm? My sister has these chronically. If I've suddenly got a small troop of them, where did they come from, and how the [bleep] can I make them go away? Or at least know when they're gone...

OK, I've woken up my parents with having lights turned on. :( But I'm starting to feel a little better, which is nice. I'm sitting up with the laptop on my lap now... improvement! I assume the meds are either kicking in or else another stone is dropping into my bladder, which is when these things are supposed to stop hurting. Or perhaps it's just not moving anymore. I'm not picky.

Yep, it's the pain meds! I better go before I start typing about purple watermelons ice skating at a luau.  :P

How long have you observed these things, Anthropositor?
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Actually, a variety of political machinations throughout the world are having tangible negative impact on curbing the spread of the Corona virus.  Sadly, the wisdom promised in the name "Homo Sapiens" seems in short supply.  If we are to survive, and mitigate the ravages we now face for the foreseeable future, we need to get coordinated and focused on the job. 

And you individual innovators who have developed anything that shows promise, may I suggest you showcase it over on the Medical Terminology Section.  If it has merit at all, I for one, would be happy to help to get it off the ground and in use as persuasively as I can.  Especially if it shows the effectiveness that the nasal filters presented here already have.  Anthropositor
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Bunnie,
I am so sorry for your ordeal but happy to hear you have your vision back.

I too have Linear IgA and have mentioned to the others on this site to make sure you get a yearly eye exam with a good opthamologist who knows about Linear IgA or at least what to look for.  It can wreak havoc in your eyes which you obviously can attest to.

Thanks for sharing your story and reminding others of how it can be in the eye.  My doctor informed me of this about six months after being diagnosed so I have been getting my eyes checked yearly.

Nicole

Background
Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA) dermatosis (LAD) is an autoimmune subepidermal vesiculobullous disease that may be idiopathic or drug-induced. Children and adults are affected, with disease of the former historically referred to as chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood. The clinical presentation is heterogeneous and appears similar to other blistering diseases, such as bullous pemphigoid and dermatitis herpetiformis
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Bunnie,
I am so sorry for your ordeal but happy to hear you have your vision back.

I too have Linear IgA and have mentioned to the others on this site to make sure you get a yearly eye exam with a good opthamologist who knows about Linear IgA or at least what to look for.  It can wreak havoc in your eyes which you obviously can attest to.

Thanks for sharing your story and reminding others of how it can be in the eye.  My doctor informed me of this about six months after being diagnosed so I have been getting my eyes checked yearly.

Nicole





Background
Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA) dermatosis (LAD) is an autoimmune subepidermal vesiculobullous disease that may be idiopathic or drug-induced. Children and adults are affected, with disease of the former historically referred to as chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood. The clinical presentation is heterogeneous and appears similar to other blistering diseases, such as bullous pemphigoid and dermatitis herpetiformis
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General Health / Re: Understanding Medical Terminology
« Last post by anthropositor on Monday November 09, 2020, 07:21:45 AM »
A bit more on hysteria, considering the world reaction to our rout of The raging rump.  He does have a real taste for anarchy.  No telling how many Pardons for profit he can give out in the coming 70 days.  In Paris, church bells pealed throughout the city.  Just think of that!  Many other world cities have throngs of celebrants dancing and hugging.  The Pandemic is still madly out of control.  70 more days of ineptitude and idiocy threaten massive additional carnage with considerable certainty.  Carry on carefully.
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General Health / Re: Understanding Medical Terminology
« Last post by anthropositor on Friday November 06, 2020, 01:38:34 AM »
Discovery, invention and innovation has changed its' character in the more recent centuries.  It is a fertile area, to examine.  The central thing I notice is that it is now almost totally corporate, institutional, and funded by government grants and other subsidy, for which there is little room for individual creators.  It is like a dystopian story out of the fevered brain of Ayn Rand or Philip K. Dick.  Creativity by committee.

The geneticist George Church comes to mind.  Kicked out of Duke university short of his intended degree, he was quite up against it.  One of his handicaps is serious.  He falls asleep without warning.  But my goodness, can that guy think!  Long story short, Harvard got wind of it, gave him a staff of perhaps dozens of grads and undergrads, each with scintillating backgrounds and talents, along with labs and equipment.  He is certainly a maverick in many ways.  But aren't we all?  On second thought, perhaps not.  His herd of facilitators seem to fit his needs to a high degree. 

I am having an interlude of relative tranquility at the moment.  My wife has recovered well from her injuries, but she has lost her sense of smell.  A bit of a mystery there.  The election is over now, except for the final count.  Even so, it is pretty certain that the most important thing happened.  We gave resident rump the shmoo treatment (kicked him out), and if we can survive his antics until we have a new President, we may then see what New York State courts may have in store for rump.  Therefore I will not dwell on the fact that itch ickonnel, L. graham cracker,  and the bevy of other Publicans retained their stranglehold on the senate, against all reason.  We got the bigger half of the loaf, by far.  Nothing is perfect.   Anthropositor
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There are still more unknowns than knowns with Covid-19.  Auto-immune responses may accelerate in some people from antibodies donated from recovered patients.  In other words, there could be complications that extend to our other essential organs rather than just the Covid-19.  We must do better than we are. 

But I believe it is fairly safe to say, you are very likely to do much better, using the nasal filters as I have engineered them here, along with the, less than perfect array of masks in use.  This Pandemic is once again spiking into the absolutely out of control levels.  This is not a time for complacency.  The wishful thinking, the widespread hopes for the best, are not going to do the job, without our personal actions to survive.  Simple apathy and ignorance will continue to kill us in droves.  Anthropositor.
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