Author Topic: Study finds strong emotional impact of atopic dermatitis/eczema  (Read 823 times)

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peterb

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Study finds strong emotional impact of atopic dermatitis/eczema
« on: Wednesday February 23, 2005, 02:57:07 PM »
International Study of Life With Atopic Eczema (ISOLATE) Shows Patients and Caregivers Are Often Overwhelmed By Eczema Flare-Ups and Treatment Options
                     
NEW ORLEANS, Feb. 23 /PRNewswire/ -- According to the results of a new
multinational survey called the International Study of Life with Atopic Eczema
(ISOLATE) a majority of eczema sufferers and caregivers (51% of patients and
63% of caregivers) live in a state of constant concern over when they might
experience their next disease flare-up.  The study also revealed that up to 75
percent of eczema patients and caregivers lack confidence in the ability to
effectively manage their disease when it does flare up.  These results were
presented this week at the 63rd annual meeting of the American Academy
of Dermatology (AAD) by Dr. Seth Orlow of New York University.

ISOLATE is the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind, including
2,000 participants from eight countries (France, Germany, Spain, Mexico,
Netherlands, Poland, United Kingdom and United States).  The data presented at
the AAD meeting are from a sub-analysis of approximately 400 patients and
caretakers of patients from the United States.  The National Eczema
Association for Science and Education (NEASE) was one of the leading groups
involved in the development and implementation of this study, along with other
patient-focused organizations around the world.

"Many people can't realize the profound impact eczema can have on the
lives of patients and, in the case of children, their caregivers, minimizing
it as just a minor nuisance. This survey demonstrates the seriousness of the
condition and the tremendous need for effective treatment options that
patients can use safely to control their disease long term.  This study also
validates the quality of life issues to qualify for health insurance coverage
for treatment.  It shows that atopic dermatitis/eczema is not a minor
irritation but a serious physical and emotional burden to patients and their
caregivers," said Vicki Kalabokes, Chief Executive Officer of NEASE.

The majority of patients (80%) and caregivers (73%) surveyed felt that
effective eczema control would represent the single most important improvement
to their quality of life.  Yet, only 24% of patients and 27% of caregivers
said they feel totally confident that they can manage the condition.

Further, the majority of patients (64%) and those caring for children
(78%) with moderate or severe eczema said they would want to use a
non-steroidal treatment that could either prevent a flare-up occurring or
reduce its severity.  They also reported that while their physicians had
provided information about the condition, they had not addressed with them the
emotional impact of the disease, or that support groups were available to
help.


Gobe

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Re: Study finds strong emotional impact of atopic dermatitis/eczema
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday February 23, 2005, 08:47:24 PM »
  They also reported that while their physicians had
provided information about the condition, they had not addressed with them the
emotional impact of the disease, or that support groups were available to
help.



It has only been  since I have been a member of this forum that I have actually had the nerve to discuss the emotional and psychological impact of my E with my derm.  He was very concerned and supportive.  I think that the main reason that derms are not able to discuss this aspect of E is due to a lack of time they have available for each patient.